Documents You Need to Send to the IRS to Claim the Earned Income Credit

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  • Refundtalk
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    Documents You Need to Send to Claim the Earned Income Credit on the Basis of a Qualifying Child or Children for Tax Year 2016. Each child that you claim must have lived with you for more than half of 2016 in the United States. The United States includes the 50 states and the District of Columbia. It doesn’t include Puerto Rico or U.S. possessions such as Guam.
    *Count time that you or the child is temporarily away from home due to special circumstances as the time the child lived with you. Examples include illness, college, business, vacation,
    military service or detention in a juvenile facility

    To prove the child lived with you in the United States, the document(s) must have:
    ● your U.S. address, your name, and the child’s name.
    (If you use a P.O. Box as your mailing address, you must
    send a completed Form 1093, P.O. Box Application stamped
    by the Post Office)
    ● the dates in 2015 the child lived at the same address as you
    must cover more than half of 2015
    ● if the document has the child’s name and your address but not
    your name, you need to send in another document with your
    name showing the same address

    You can send one or more of the following documents to prove the child lived with you for more than half of 2016:
    ● school records (you may need to send one or more school
    records)
    ● Medical records from doctors, hospital or medical clinic
    (immunization records may not include all the necessary
    information)
    ● adoption or child placement documents
    ● court records

    Or, send dated statements on letterhead from:
    ● the child’s school
    ● the child’s childcare provider (not a relative)
    ● the child’s health care provider, doctor, nurse or clinic
    ● a social service agency
    ● a placement agency official
    ● your employer
    ● an Indian tribal official
    ● your landlord or property manager
    ● a place of worship
    ● shelters

    2.)Each child that you claim must be related to you in one of the ways listed below. If the child is:
    Your son or daughter (including an adopted child)
    If your name is not on the child’s birth certificate, send us other records or documents proving you are the parent such as adoption records, court decree or paternity test results.
    If the child was not born in the United States, we need a copy of the birth certificate or immigration papers in English or a copy of the legal translation.

    Your grandchild or great grandchild
    Then send in one or more birth certificates or other legal documents proving how you are related. For example, If you are claiming your:
    ● Grandchild, send your child’s and grandchild’s birth certificates
    ● Great grandchild, send your child’s, your grandchild’s and your great grandchild’s birth certificates
    If the names aren’t on the birth certificates, you need to send another type of documents such as a court decree or paternity
    test results.

    Your niece or nephew
    Then send in one or more birth certificates or other legal documents proving how you are related. For example, the child’s birth certificate, showing your brother as the father, your brother’s birth certificate showing your mother’s name and your birth certificate showing your mother’s name.
    If the names aren’t on the birth certificates, you need another type of documents such as a court decree or paternity test

    Your stepson, stepdaughter, step-brother, step-sister, step-grandchild, or step-great-grandchild
    Then send in one or more birth certificates or other legal documents, such as court papers or marriage licenses, proving how you are related.
    If the birth certificate doesn’t have the name of the parent to prove how you are related, you need another type of
    The document, such as court decree or DNA test results.

    3.) Age of each child that you claim is:
    Under age 19 at the end of 2016 and younger than you (or your spouse if filing a joint return)
    ● age 19 but under age 24 at the end of 2016, and
    ● a full-time student for any part of 5 calendar months during
    2016, and
    ● younger than you (or your spouse if filing a joint return)
    then send in
    ● School records showing the child was considered a full-time student for any part of five months of the tax year.
    It can be any five months of the year. The months do not have to be consecutive.
    ● The school records must show the child’s name and the dates the child attended school during 2016

    Any age and permanently and totally disabled at any time during 2016
    Then send in a letter from a doctor, other health care provider, a social service program or government agency verifying the person is: permanently and totally disabled. To be permanently and totally disabled for EIC purposes, the condition must last or be expected to last continuously for at least a year or is expected to result in death; and the person can’t work or perform other substantial gainful activities. We must have proof for all three: you are related to the child, the child lived with you and the child’s age. If you don’t have or can’t get the legal documents that we ask for, you can’t claim EITC with that child. But, you may still be eligible for EIC without a qualifying child.

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